The Zealot Mindset

By Dan Butterfield

Zealots are true believers.

More notably: Zealots believe the ends justify the means—regardless of the moral, ethical, or lawful implications of their actions.

Kelly Reagan Brunner is a zealot.

The Texas a social worker in her zeal to remove Donald Trump from office signed up 67 residents at a nursing care facility. None of the residents had given Ms. Brunner their consent, yet she signed them up to receive mail-in ballots—then proceeded to fill those ballots out and return them.

Ms. Brunner now faces 137 counts of voter fraud—not to mention charges of mail fraud.

Kelly Reagan Brunner did not see her actions as criminal—because her actions were for the greater good, therefore, they were morally justified.

This is the mindset of zealots.

In is worth pointing out: Zealots don’t think of the negative consequences of their actions.

It’s simply not part of the zealot mindset.

Mr. Richard Baris, director of Big Data Poll, compared election returns in Michigan against the Social Security Death Index (SSDI). He discovered nearly 10,000 dead Michiganders had voted in the 2020 election.

Why were the dead included in the Michigan vote tally?

No competent criminal would have left such an obvious clue for authorities to discover. Zealots on the other hand are fixated on the end goal—covering their tracks simply isn’t a consideration.

Again, it must be pointed out, zealots believe they are morally justified—not only are they morally justified, but they are obligated to the cause.

In a word, zealots are committed.

On the positive side: this single-minded focus also makes it easy to uncover the unlawful acts committed by zealots.

Four years of constant vitriol by liberals and the liberal media has motivated the likes of Kelly Reagan Brunner to action. And in their zeal, they truly believe their acts of voter fraud are righteous.

This is the mindset of the zealot.