The Rock of Talk 'Daily Blast' for Friday, June 11th, 2021

The Conservative Calendar, Top 10 Links, Local/State News Briefing, U.S. News Briefing, Global News Briefing, and Questions of the Day

GOOD MORNING FROM THE ROCK OF TALK!

ABQ.FM / AM 1600 KIVA Albuquerque / AM 1490 KRSN Santa Fe / FM 107.1 Los Alamos

Don’t forget! Download our app and listen to “The Rock of Talk” and 65 other radio stations 24/7. Get news, weather, commentary, The Rock of Talk TV, and podcasts all in one app! Amazing!
Download The Rock of Talk TV for ROKU, Amazon Fire or Apple TV. Available now by searching “The Rock of Talk” on the TV platforms below or visit https://rockoftalk.tv/apps/.

You can watch here now at www.rockoftalk.tv — or if you already have the ABQ.FM app, you can access Rock of Talk TV! Plays 24/7.

HERE’S THE BLAST!

Reading Time: 7 minutes 55 seconds

Dogs’ lives are short, too short, but you know that going in. You know the pain is coming, you’re going to lose a dog, and there’s going to be great anguish, so you live fully in the moment with her, never fail to share her joy or delight in her innocence, because you can’t support the illusion that a dog can be your lifelong companion. There’s such beauty in the hard honesty of that, in accepting and giving love while always aware it comes with an unbearable price. Maybe loving dogs is a way we do penance for all the other illusions we allow ourselves and for the mistakes we make because of those illusions.

— Dean Koontz

THE CONSERVATIVE CALENDAR

Forecast from the KIVA Weather Station: Sunny and hot. High 97F. Winds WSW at 5 to 10 mph.

Today is Friday, June 11th, the 162nd day of 2021. There are 203 days left in the year. It is King Kamehameha I Day.

This Day in History

In 1509, Henry VIII married Catherine of Aragon.

In 1770, Captain James Cook ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef.

In 1776, the Continental Congress appointed Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston to the Committee of Five to draft a declaration of independence.

In 1805, a fire consumed large portions of Detroit.

In 1837, the Broad Street Riot, fueled by ethnic tensions between Yankees and Irish, occurred in Boston.

In 1942, the United States government agreed to send Lend-Lease aid to the Soviet Union.

In 1955, 83 spectators were killed and at least 100 were injured after an Austin-Healey and a Mercedes-Benz collided at the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

In 2001, Timothy McVeigh was executed for his role in the Oklahoma City bombing.

In 2010, the first FIFA World Cup to be played in Africa kicked off in South Africa.

This Day in Music History

In 1960, drummer Tommy Moore made the ill-advised decision to quit The Beatles and return to his job of driving a forklift.

In 1966, The Rolling Stones started a two-week run at No. 1 on the singles chart with “Paint It, Black.”

In 1977, KC and the Sunshine Band reached the top of the charts with “I’m Your Boogie Man.”

In 2002, Paul McCartney married Heather Mills. They would separate four years later, and upon their divorce, Mills received a lump sum of £16.5 million and assets worth £7.8 million.

In 2004, Courtney Love surrendered to police after allegedly assaulting a woman at the home of her former manager and ex-boyfriend.

Today’s Birthdays

Three-time World Drivers’ Championship winner Jackie Stewart is 82. Actress Adrienne Barbeau is 76. Pro Football Hall of Famer Joe Montana is 65. Actor Hugh Laurie is 62. Actor Peter Dinklage is 52. Actor Joshua Jackson is 43. Actor Shia LaBeouf is 35.

WATCH THE SHOW 24/7 AT THIS LINK: http://rockoftalk.tv

TOP 10 LINKS: NEWS, COMMENTARY, RESEARCH, AUDIO, AND VIDEO

  1. City of Albuquerque’s new project aims to increase bee population

  2. Race is on to see who will represent a huge chunk of NE ABQ

  3. Former Las Vegas mayor claims she was victim of double jeopardy

  4. From Beans to Burgers, Food Is Getting More Expensive

  5. With Capitalism, Cooperation Is Just as Important as Competition

  6. Hate Crimes Against Catholics Are Multiplying (But Politicians And Media Don’t Want To Talk About It)

  7. Paul Krugman’s 10-Year History of Being Wrong About Bitcoin

  8. LISTEN: Local Barriers to Economic Recovery

  9. No, ‘systemic racism’ is not why so many black kids are in foster care

  10. Lessons In Critical Race Theory From Behind The Iron Curtain

MAINSTREAM LOCAL/STATE NEWS BRIEFINGS

(Bolded for your attention / analyses)

New Mexico again offers virus relief to immigrants, elderly

SANTA FE — New Mexico residents who weren’t eligible for those $1,400 direct cash payments from the federal government have another chance to get some direct relief. New Mexico state officials are accepting applications starting next week for a $5 million program approved by the state legislature. It offers up to $750 to state residents not eligible for federal relief, including immigrants in the country without legal permission, elderly residents who count as dependents, and others. Applicants can prove residency with taxpayer numbers and state driver’s licenses. Both are available to immigrants without legal status. A similar round of payments in December reached around 15,000 people.

New Mexico begins push to improve spotty internet access

SANTA FE — New Mexico’s top information technology official says a new $100 million state account for expanding access to high-speed internet is just a start and that investments of $1 billion are likely needed to modernize infrastructure. In a presentation to legislators on Thursday, Information Technology Secretary John Salazar said that international consultant Deloitte is helping the state anticipate opportunities for federal grants to improve internet access and data transfer rates. A nationwide search is underway for an administrator to guide New Mexico’s expansion of high-speed internet. The COVID-19 pandemic and a year-long pivot to online learning have exposed gaps in internet service.

MAINSTREAM U.S. NEWS BRIEFINGS

(Bolded for your attention / analyses)

Federal investigators to examine deadly Phoenix tanker crash

PHOENIX — Federal safety officials say they will investigate a crash in which authorities say a milk tanker going too fast collided with seven passenger vehicles on a Phoenix freeway, killing four people and injuring at least nine. The Arizona Department of Public Safety said the crash occurred late Wednesday after the tanker “failed to slow for traffic congestion.” The National Transportation Safety Board says it’s sending nine investigators to conduct a safety investigation. An agency spokesman says the investigation will include studying whether the crash could have been prevented if the tanker was equipped with electronic safety devices such as automatic emergency braking.

Secret recordings show Southern Baptist dispute on sex abuse

NASHVILLE — Releases of leaked letters and secret recordings from within the Southern Baptist Convention are intensifying as critics seek to show top leaders were slow to address sexual abuse and worried more about its reputation and donations than about victims. A former executive of the denomination’s ethics agency has posted audio clips he clandestinely recorded in internal meetings. The aim is to bolster claims that leaders of the SBC’s Executive Committee sought to slow or block policies responding to abuse by ministers and other church leaders, and that they tried to intimidate those seeking a more robust response. The committee members are defending their actions, saying the recordings reflect the normal give-and-take of policy development.

$15M awarded over eggs, embryos ruined at fertility clinic

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal jury has awarded nearly $15 million to five people who lost eggs or embryos when a cryogenic storage tank failed at a San Francisco fertility clinic. Jurors found the tank maker, Chart Industries, 90% responsible for the 2018 mishap that ruined thousands of eggs and embryos at Pacific Fertility Center. The center was found 10% responsible. At trial, the five plaintiffs described their pain at their loss, which jurors blamed on malfunctioning equipment.

Dog ejected from vehicle in Idaho crash found herding sheep

SPOKANE — A dog who vanished for two days after being ejected from a vehicle during a car accident has been found apparently doing the job it was bred to do — herding sheep. The Spokesman-Review reported that Linda Oswald’s family and their dog, Tilly, were driving on an Idaho highway Sunday and crashed into another car, launching the border collie and red heeler mix and prompting an immediate search. Oswald said the family wrote a Facebook post that was shared more than 3,000 times. A family recognized the dog in the photo as the dog they saw on their farm on Tuesday. The families say Tilly was drawn to the farm’s sheep and trying to herd.

The unanswered ‘Jeopardy!’ question: Who’s the new host?

LOS ANGELES — Jeopardy! needed a host in 1984, and Lucille Ball had an enthusiastic suggestion for creator Merv Griffin: The debonair Canadian who was emcee of the High Rollers game show. Decades later, filling the void left by Alex Trebek’s death involves sophisticated research and a parade of guest hosts doing their best to impress viewers and the studio that will make the call. The possible contenders include Mayim Bialik, Anderson Cooper, Katie Couric and Jeopardy! champs Ken Jennings and Buzzy Cohen. Among those yet to emcee is LeVar Burton. Taping for next season is expected to begin later this summer.

MAINSTREAM GLOBAL NEWS BRIEFINGS

(Bolded for your attention / analyses)

Mexico marks 50th anniversary of 1971 student massacre

MEXICO CITY — Mexican officials and protesters are marking the 50th anniversary of a June 10, 1971, massacre of student protesters depicted in the 2018 Oscar-winning movie Roma. Demonstrators marched Thursday down the same boulevard in Mexico City where students were attacked with guns and clubs by government-organized thugs 50 years ago. Assistant Interior Secretary Alejandro Encinas said 37 students were killed and he vowed that the massacre will not be forgotten. The students set out from a teacher’s college just west of the city center in 1971 for one of the first large-scale protests since hundreds were killed in a far larger massacre in 1968.

Sinkhole at Mexico farm swallows more land, traps 2 dogs

MEXICO CITY — A large sinkhole that appeared in late May in a farm in central Mexico has now grown larger than a football field, stretching over 400 feet (125 meters) across at some points. The sinkhole has expanded so much that it has begun swallowing a house, and trapped two dogs. The Mexican government has sent in soldiers to keep people 2,000 feet (600 meters) away from the hole, which is about 50 feet (15 meters) deep. The national civil defense office warned that people should stay away from the site east of Mexico City, saying there is a risk of further ground factures.

Ex-Mossad chief signals Israel behind Iran nuclear attacks

DUBAI — The outgoing chief of Israel’s Mossad intelligence service has offered the closest acknowledgment yet his country was behind recent attacks targeting Iran’s nuclear program and a military scientist. The comments by Yossi Cohen offered an extraordinary debriefing by the head of the typically secretive agency in what appears to be the final days of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s rule. It also gave a clear warning to other scientists in Iran’s nuclear program that they too could become targets. Cohen spoke to Israel’s Channel 12 investigative program Uvda. Iran did not immediately comment on Cohen’s remarks.

Report on Tigray: 350,000 face famine, 2 million a step away

A dire new report warns that over 350,000 people in Ethiopia’s embattled Tigray province are facing famine and over 2 million are just a step away. It blames the ongoing conflict, displacement of thousands of people, limited humanitarian access, and loss of harvests and income. The report released by 15 U.N. agencies and humanitarian organizations projects that between July and September the number of people facing  famine will rise to over 400,000. It says the data must serve as “an urgent call for the delivery of crucial life-saving assistance” for 5.5 million people in Tigray and neighboring regions.

Leftist teacher inches toward victory in disputed Peru vote

LIMA — Peru has finished tallying votes in the country’s tight presidential contest but no winner has been declared, with electoral authorities saying they are scrutinizing a small number of ballots amid unproven claims of possible vote tampering leveled by the apparent loser. With votes from rural areas and Peruvian embassies abroad fully in Thursday, leftist Pedro Castillo maintains a narrow lead of 70,774 votes over conservative Keiko Fujimori. But the electoral tribunal is expected to take a week or more to officially declare a winner. Fujimori says as many as 200,000 votes could still be up for grabs.

‘ROCK OF TALK’ QUESTIONS OF THE DAY FOR OUR COMMUNITY (PLEASE ANSWER IN COMMENTS)

  1. Cooperation or competition?

  2. Ever been to Hawaii?

  3. Should illegal immigrants in New Mexico get $750 stimmy checks?

  4. Do you own any cryptocurrency?

  5. Why should taxpayers subsidize broadband access?

  6. Have you adjusted your grocery budget due to inflation?

  7. Greatest NFL quarterback of all time?

  8. Do you own a dog?

  9. Who’s your pick to replace Alex Trebek?

  10. Were it not for U.S. aid, would Stalin have survived during and after World War II?

Leave a comment

Give a gift subscription